The Learning Center

Learn more about common conditions we treat.

Make An Appointment

An ulcer is an open sore. Our practice treats ulcers that occur anywhere below the knee. An ulcer can be shallow and only involve the surface of the skin. Or an ulcer can be very deep extending down to tendon or bone.

Although anyone can develop an ulcer, those with diabetes and poor circulation are at a higher risk of developing them. Elderly are more likely to develop leg ulcers due to poor venous blood flow. Once noticed, an ulcer should be treated promptly by a wound specialist. Even a small shallow ulcer can become infected and lead to other complications if not treated promptly and properly.

Learn more about the different types of ulcers.

What Is It?

Venous insufficiency is when the veins of the leg do not allow the blood to properly flow back toward the heart. Veins contain valves to help push the blood toward the heart. These valves can become weak or work improperly and cause the blood to pool in the leg.

What Causes It?

  • High blood pressure
  • Lack of exercise
  • Smoking
  • Age–the valves in leg veins may weaken or become less effective with age
  • People who have had an injury or blood clot in the leg are at a higher risk to develop venous insufficiency

Signs & Symptoms

  • Pain and/or itching in the legs and feet
  • Swelling of the legs and feet
  • Varicose veins
  • Reddish to brownish discoloration of the legs, especially near the ankles
  • Leg ulcers

What Do I Do?

  • Exercise to help improve blood flow
  • Keep legs elevated
  • Compression hosiery may be prescribed by your doctor
  • Medication such as diuretics or blood-thinners may be prescribed by your doctor
  • Surgical intervention

If Left Untreated

If left untreated, venous insufficiency can lead to swelling of the legs and feet, pain in the legs and feet, and can lead to ulcers–a breakdown of the skin–which can lead to infection.

Prevention Tips

  • Exercise
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Stop smoking

Turf toe is a foot condition caused by a hyperextension of the great toe producing a swollen, painful joint. The name turf toe is derived from frequent occurrences on artificial surfaces.

What Is It?

Turf toe is when the joint at the base of the great toe become sprained or strained.

What Causes It?

Turf toe may be caused from a sudden jamming of the great toe into a hard surface. Turf toe can also result from repetitive or excessive pushing off of the big toe when running or jumping, or by suddenly jamming the toe into a hard surface.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Pain at the base of the great toe
  • Swelling of the great toe
  • Limited range of motion of the joint at the base of the great toe

What Do I Do?

  • Rest and ice the toe
  • Strap the toe to the adjacent toe for support
  • Sometimes immobilization with a boot or cast is necessary
  • Oral anti-inflammatory medication may also be recommended by your doctor to help reduce inflammation and pain

If Left Untreated

If turf toe isn’t treated, you can expect to experience continued pain, swelling, and limited range of motion of the joint at the base of the great toe.

Prevention Tips

  • Wear shoes with better support to prevent excessive strain on the great toe
  • Inserts can be worn to help prevent strain and limit motion of the joint at the base of the great toe

What Is It?

Shin Splints refer to pain occurring at the front of the lower leg. Shin splints are an overuse injury often seen in runners.

What Causes It?

There are several causes of shin splints. Some of the more common causes are running on an uneven or hard surface, running in non-supportive or worn-out shoes, inadequate stretching prior to running, and poor foot mechanics when running (such as overpronation).

Signs & Symptoms

  • Tenderness over the shin
  • Lower leg pain that goes away with rest, but returns with running or other activities
  • Mild swelling
  • Pain when flexing the foot downward

What Do I Do?

  • Rest to allow the injury to heal
  • Ice in the early stages of the injury to help reduce inflammation
  • Stretch the lower leg muscles
  • Insoles or orthotics can help reduce shock and can help control the biomechanics of the foot
  • Shin or calf supports and sleeves can also help provide compression and support to the lower leg

Prevention Tips

Stretching and wearing properly-fitting shoes. Orthotics will also help control the motion of your foot and therefore reduce the stress placed on the lower leg muscles.

What Is It?

Sever’s disease is a common cause of heel pain in growing children, especially those that play sports. Also called calcaneal apophysitis, it results from inflammation of the growth plate in the heel.

What Causes It?

During early puberty, the heel bone sometimes grows faster than the leg muscles and tendons. This can cause the muscles and tendons (especially the Achilles Tendon, which attaches to the heel bone) to become overstretched, making the heel less flexible and putting pressure on the growth plate. Over time, repeated stress on the overstretched tendon can cause the growth plate of the heel to become inflamed and painful. The excess stress can result from sports or other physical activities that involve a lot of running and jumping.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Pain or tenderness in one or both heels–generally at the back of the heel, but may extend to the bottom of the heel and arch
  • Swelling and redness in the heel
  • Walking on tiptoes or limping to avoid putting pressure on the heel
  • Symptoms are usually worse during or immediately after physical activity, and improve with rest

What Do I Do?

  • Rest to reduce pressure on the heel and allow the inflammation and pain to subside
  • Heel cups can help reduce the pain
  • Occasionally, a cast or walking boot is necessary to help immobilize the foot so it can heal
  • Your doctor should be consulted. If your child participates in sports or other physical activities that impact the heel, these activities may need to be reduced or completely stopped to allow for healing.

If Left Untreated

  • Increased pain and a longer recovery period when treatment does begin.
  • Inability to participate in activities due to the heel pain

Prevention Tips

With correct treatment, Sever’s Disease usually heals within 2-4 weeks. However, if prevention measures are not taken, Sever’s Disease can reoccur:

  • Wear properly-fitting shoes
  • Avoid high heels
  • Utilize heel cushions
  • Use arch supports that hold the heel in the ideal position

What Is It?

Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis and autoimmune disease that mainly affects the small joints of the hands and feet.

What Causes It?

In rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system attacks the body’s own tissues, specifically the lining of the joints, which can cause painful swelling of the joints and eventually lead to erosion of the bone and possible deformity.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Joint pain or stiffness in the morning that lasts more than an hour
  • Swelling of the joints, especially joints in the hand
  • Deformity of the joints in the hands and feet
  • Nodules over the joints, generally nonpainful
  • Flu-like symptoms

What Do I Do?

Prescription medication is needed to treat Rheumatoid Arthritis. Although medication will not cure Rheumatoid Arthritis, it can slow the progression and treat the symptoms. The objective of treatment is to reduce the inflammation, relieve pain, and help prevent bone damage.

Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARD) are the main medications used to help slow the progression of Rheumatoid Arthritis. Other medications including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication may also be prescribed.

If Left Untreated

Without treatment, bone destruction and deformity will likely occur over time. These effects are permanent, which makes it important to treat rheumatoid arthritis when the symptoms are first noticed. Early treatment may prevent deformities, which can limit physical activity.

Prevention Tips

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, which means that it cannot be prevented. However, early and aggressive treatment can slow its progression and limit bone destruction and deformity.

Pain in the heel and can radiate along the arch, generally worse when first getting out of bed or when first standing after sitting for a while.

What Is It?

Commonly called “heel spur.” The plantar fascia is the band of tissue that runs from the heel bone (calcaneus) to the toes, helping to create the arch of the foot. Plantar fasciitis is when this band of tissue becomes stressed or overused, causing inflammation and pain. The pain usually occurs at the heel, where the plantar fascia connects, but can also radiate along the arch of the foot.

What Causes It?

  • Sudden weight gain (such as from pregnancy) or obesity
  • Running long distances–especially if running on a new or uneven surface
  • People with high, arched feet or flat feet
  • Poorly-fitting or very tight shoes without proper suppor

Signs & Symptoms

  • Pain at the bottom of the heel
  • Pain in the heel is usually worse when taking the first few steps in the morning, or when standing after being seated for a longer period of time
  • Redness or mild inflammation of the heel
  • On X-ray, a heel spur may be evident. The heel spur itself is generally not the cause of the pain. However, it is a sign that the plantar fascia is pulling on the heel bone, causing the spur to develop.

What Do I Do?

  • Rest the foot as much as possible
  • Stretch the foot and heel before physical activity
  • Wear shoes with proper support or heel cups
  • Wear orthotics to control the motion of the foot, and decrease stress on the plantar fascia
  • Anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen
  • May use night splints to stretch the plantar fascia while you sleep, which helps reduce the pain of those first steps in the morning
  • Steroid shot injections may be needed to help decrease the inflammation

If Left Untreated

Most cases of plantar fasciitis resolve with treatment. Few cases require surgical intervention, however, if left untreated, it may take longer to resolve or heal, and may increase the chance that surgery will be necessary.

Prevention Tips

  • Stretch the leg and foot muscles prior to exercise
  • Wear shoes with good support

If you have previously had plantar fasciitis or have an arch problem, consult a podiatrist about wearing prescription orthotics to prevent plantar fasciitis from occurring or reoccurring.

What Is It?

Peripheral vascular disease is a build-up of plaque resulting in a narrowing or blocking of the arteries and veins outside of the heart and brain. While there are many forms of peripheral vascular disease, it is often referred to as Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). PAD is occurs when the vessels that carry blood away from the heart to the organs, arms, legs and feet become blocked, either partially or completely.

What Causes It?

  • Age
  • Smoking
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure

Signs & Symptoms

  • Leg pain or cramping that occurs with exercise and goes away at rest (known as intermittent claudication)
  • Foot or leg pain at night when in bed
  • Numbness of the extremities
  • Cold feet
  • Hair loss on the legs and feet
  • Discoloration of the lower legs and feet
  • Painful sores on the toes in severe cases of PAD

What Do I Do?

  • Exercise
  • Medications can be prescribed to prevent clotting, facilitate blood flow, lower cholesterol and blood pressure
  • Angioplasty–minimally invasive surgical procedure that helps to open up an artery
  • A stent (metal mesh tube) may be placed where the artery narrows in order to keep it open
  • Endarterectomy–a surgical procedure that cleans the plaque from the artery walls to help open the artery up and improve blood flow
  • Arterial Bypass–surgical procedure where a synthetic or grafted vessel is used to redirect blood flow around a blocked artery

If Left Untreated

If left untreated, peripheral vascular disease can lead to increased pain, sores on the toes, and in very severe cases can lead to amputation.

There are many types of arthritis. Generally, when people talk about arthritis, they are usually referring to the most common form, osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis develops as we age. Over the years, the cartilage on the ends of bones becomes worn. This can result in inflammation, swelling and pain in the joint.

What Is It?

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. Also known as degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis occurs when there is a loss of cartilage in the joints causing bone to rub against bone, which results in chronic pain, stiffness, and limited mobility.

What Causes It?

  • Genetic factors
  • Over-use
  • Trauma

Other underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, genetic disorders, and metabolic diseases can make one more prone to develop osteoarthritis.

Signs & Symptoms

Joint pain and stiffness–commonly in the hips, knees, spine, hands, and feet.

What Do I Do?

  • Exercise–strengthens muscles and helps promote cartilage growth
  • Avoid high impact sports
  • Maintain a healthy weight–extra weight can cause more wear and tear on the joints
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS)* to help decrease inflammation and alleviate pain
  • Chondroitin & Glucosamine*–over-the-counter medications that stimulate collagen growth

*A doctor should be consulted prior to taking these medications.

If Left Untreated

If left untreated, osteoarthritis can lead to lack of function.

Prevention Tips

Maintain a healthy weight to prevent stress on the joints
Regular exercise–a lack of exercise can cause the muscles and joints to weaken & stiffen

Morton’s Neuroma is an enlarged or entrapped nerve that usually occurs between the third and fourth toes. The most common symptom of a neuroma is sharp or shooting pain usually between the third and fourth toes. The pain usually is worsened by wearing shoes and by walking; it can be minimized by removing the shoes and not bearing weight.

What Is It?

Morton’s neuroma is a thickening or inflammation of the nerve between the third and fourth toes, and occurs more often in women than men.

What Causes It?

Morton’s neuroma can occur in response to irritation, injury, or pressure from wearing tightly-fitting shoes.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Sharp, burning pain in the ball of the foot
  • Commonly occurs between the long bones of the third and fourth toes
  • Toes also may sting, burn, or feel numb
  • Pain may worsen when you wear narrow or tightly-fitting shoes

What Do I Do?

  • Wear shoes with a wider toebox
  • Rest the affected foot
  • Padding – such as a metatarsal pad or neuroma pad
  • Use arch supports or orthotics
  • If the pain is persistent and conservative treatment is not working, a doctor may recommend anti-inflammatory medication, a cortisone injection, or even surgery

If Left Untreated

If left untreated, the pain may worsen or become more consistent. Burning, tingling, or even numbness of the toes may occur. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent surgery from being necessary.

Prevention Tips

Wear shoes that fit well and have a wide toebox. Shoes with a pointed toe or narrow toebox can cause pressure and irritation that leads to the inflammation of the nerve.

Orthotics can also help prevent a neuroma.

Metatarsalgia is a general term that refers to pain located in the ball of the foot. Ball-of-foot pain is frequently caused from poor fitting shoes, most often by women’s dress shoes. Footwear with a narrow toe box can cause the forefoot (ball-of-foot area) to be squeezed which can cause metatarsalgia.

What Is It?

Metatarsalgia is pain in the ball of the foot.

What Causes It?

Metatarsalgia can be caused by anything that puts stress on the ball of the foot:

  • Improperly-fitting footwear
  • Aging–the fat pad on the bottom of the foot gets thinner and contributes to additional stress
  • High-impact exercise and sports
  • Foot shape or deformity
  • Arthritis
  • Overweight–causes additional stress on the bottom of the foot
  • Bunions & Hammer Toes
  • Neuroma–a pinched or inflamed nerve between the metatarsal bones of the foot
  • Diabetes–can cause the nerves of the foot to be irritated

Signs & Symptoms

  • Pain in the ball of the foot
  • Burning pain on the bottom of the foot
  • Pain is generally worse when bearing weight

What Do I Do?

  • Ice the ball of the foot
  • Rest
  • Avoid high-impact exercise and sports
  • Wear shoes that fit properly
  • Wear orthotics or shock-absorbing insoles
  • Wear ball of foot cushions

If Left Untreated

  • Increased pain throughout the foot
  • Antalgic gait (limping)

Prevention Tips

  • Wear shoes that fit properly
  • Wear arch supports or shock-absorbing insoles
  • Maintain a healthy body weight

An ingrown toenail happens when the edge of the nail grows into the skin along the side of the nail. This usually just starts as some minor discomfort, gradually becoming more painful.

What Is It?

An ingrown toenail occurs when the side of the toenail grows into the skin and will over time become increasingly painful.

What Causes It?

Ingrown toenails can be caused by poor trimming of the nails or footwear that is too tight. The inherent shape of a toenail as well as trauma to the toenail can make it more likely to become an ingrown nail.

Signs & Symptoms

Pain is the main symptom of an ingrown toenail, often beginning as minor discomfort that gradually becomes more painful. The toe may also become red and inflamed along the side of the nail.

What Do I Do?

Treatment consists of foot soaks, padding over the toe to prevent further irritation, and cutting or filing the nail straight across with an appropriate toenail clipper or toenail file. If the ingrown nail persists, it may need to be removed by a podiatrist.

If Left Untreated

If left untreated, an ingrown nail may lead to an infection. The infection can spread, causing the toe to become red, inflamed, and more painful.

Prevention Tips

Ingrown toenails can be prevented by trimming the nail straight across, and not cutting into the corners of a toenail, as well as wearing shoes that have plenty of room in the toe box. Those with poor circulation, neuropathy or diabetes should not do any self-management of ingrown toenails, but should see a podiatrist for specialized treatment of an ingrown toenail, as well as for routine trimming of toenails.

A hammer toe is when the base of the toe points upward and the end of the toe points down. The symptoms of a hammertoe are usually first noticed when a corn develops on the top of the toe, and the toe becomes painful. The toe will typically be most painful with tight fitting shoes.

What Is It?

A hammer toe deformity occurs when the base of the toe points upward, and the end of the toe points down.

What Causes It?

Common causes of a hammer toe deformity include:

  • Wearing shoes that do not fit properly
  • Weak muscles in the foot
  • Heredity–some people are more prone to developing hammer toes.
  • Other causes of hammer toes are conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and stroke.

Signs & Symptoms

The symptoms of a hammer toe are often noticed when a corn develops on the top of the toe, and the toe becomes painful. The toe will typically be most painful with tight-fitting shoes. A callus may even develop under the ball of the foot due to the position of the underlying metatarsal (one of five long bones in the forefoot).

What Do I Do?

Conservative treatment consists of hammer toe cushions, toe spacers for toes that may be rubbing together or overlapping, orthotics, toe straighteners, and shoes with a deep, wide toe box. Non-medicated pads can be used if corns or calluses develop. In some cases, surgical correction is necessary to fix a hammer toe deformity.

If Left Untreated

If left untreated, the hammer toe deformity may worsen. This can cause discomfort when wearing shoes and can lead to corns developing on the tops as well as the tips of the toes.

Prevention Tips

Wearing shoes that fit well is the best prevention. However, some people develop hammer toes unrelated to shoe wear–for these people wearing orthotics and consulting a podiatrist early on is the best way to prevent the condition from progressing.

Flat feet, also known as Pes Planus, is where the arch on the inside of your feet is flattened. Flat feet can contribute to problems in your feet, ankles and knees and other foot problems such as plantar fasciitis, tendonitis, bunions and calluses.

What Is It?

Flat feet, or fallen arches, occurs when the arch of the foot collapses so that the entire sole of the foot is in contact with the ground when standing. Flat feet are normal in infants and toddlers because the arch has not yet developed.

What Causes It?

  • Genetics (born with flat feet)
  • Weak arches
  • Trauma
  • Arthritis
  • Aging
  • Muscular and Nervous System diseases

Signs & Symptoms

Often, flat feet do not cause any pain. However, flat feet can cause foot and ankle pain especially after standing for a long period of time, or after physical activity such as playing sports.

What Do I Do?

  • Over-the-counter or custom orthotics are often prescribed for those with symptomatic flat feet.
  • Stretching exercises to stretch the tendons, especially the Achilles tendon.
  • Proper footwear that offers support.
  • Surgery may be necessary in cases where tendon repair is needed.
  • A doctor should be consulted to determine the best treatment. If you do not have any symptoms, treatment is usually not necessary.

If Left Untreated

Flat feet can not only cause foot pain but can also lead to knee and lower back pain.

Prevention Tips

Flat feet are generally not preventable.

Corns and calluses are a thick, hardened area of skin over an area that has increased pressure or friction.

What Is It?

Corns and calluses usually occur over a bony prominence such as a contracted toe, hammer toe, bunion, or under the ball of the foot. When corns and calluses become painful there are several non-surgical options for treatment. However, if the area becomes red or inflamed, you should contact a medical professional such as a podiatrist.

What Causes It?

  • Shoes that fit poorly
  • Activities that increase stress or pressure on the foot

Signs & Symptoms

  • Thickening of the Skin
  • Pain

What Do I Do?

  • Non-medicated corn pads and callus pads
  • Toe spacers
  • Orthotics
  • When used regularly, foot creams and ointments can soften the corn or callus
  • Pumice stones and foot files are another option to help reduce thickness
  • Shoes that fit properly
  • Surgical correction

If Left Untreated

Without any treatment, corns and calluses will become larger and thicker. They may cause pain, become irritated, and can even cause the underlying skin to ulcerate or become infected, especially in those with diabetes, neuropathy or poor circulation.

Prevention Tips

Wearing shoes that fit properly is the best way to prevent corns and calluses.
A bony deformity such as a bunion or hammer toe can create a pressure point leading to a corn or callus formation. A podiatrist should be consulted for treatment of the underlying condition causing the corn or callus.

A bunion is a bony protrusion at the base of the big toe.

What Is It?

Bunions are a common foot problem that present as a bony projection at the base of the big toe. When a patient has a bunion, the big toe moves toward the other toes. Although less common, a bunion may also form at the joint at the base of the little (or fifth) toe, known as a tailor’s bunion.

What Causes It?

Bunions are most common in women, usually caused by improperly-fitting footwear.

Other causes consist of:

  • Genetic predisposition
  • Arthritis
  • Trauma

Signs & Symptoms

Over time, redness and inflammation may develop over the bunion. Pain can also develop around the bunion area when wearing shoes and when walking. The big toe may eventually come to lie over or under the second toe causing further irritation especially when wearing shoes. It is also possible to develop a bony protrusion, but never experience any pain.

What Do I Do?

Conservative treatment is generally recommended first, consisting of comfortable shoes with a wider toe box, and wearing orthotics, as well as moleskin or bunion pads, to help cushion and protect the affected area. There are also bunion splints that, while not a permanent correction, can help pull the toe into more correct alignment so shoes are more comfortable. Surgical correction of a bunion deformity is an option if conservative treatment does not provide relief.

If Left Untreated

If left untreated, the bunion deformity may worsen. Eventually, this may cause the big toe to lie over or under the second toe, which causes further irritation while wearing shoes, as well as increased pain. In some cases, the deformity can worsen but may not cause any discomfort.

Prevention Tips

To help prevent bunions, wear shoes that fit correctly. If you already have bunions, wear shoes with a wide, deep toe-box, and ask a podiatrist about wearing orthotics.

Athlete’s foot is a skin infection in the foot caused by a fungus. When the feet stay moist, warm and irritated, this fungus can thrive and infect the skin. Athletes feet is also called tinea pedis. The fungus that causes athletes foot can be found on floors and in socks & shoes. The fungus can be spread from person to person by contact with these objects. The symptoms of athletes feet include itching and burning feet. The skin frequently peels and, in severe cases, there may be cracking, bleeding and pain. Some foot care products that may be used to treat athletes foot include antifungal creams and soaps, antifungal shoe sprays, drying agents and foot soaks. If you notice any redness, increased swelling, bleeding, or if the athletes foot is not clearing up, see your health care practitioner.

What Is It?

Also known as Tinea Pedis, athlete’s foot is an infection of the foot that is caused by fungus.

What Causes It?

  • Keeping your feet wet for prolonged periods of time (such as excessive foot sweating)
  • Trauma
  • Contact with an item that contains the fungus (such as shoes or socks)
  • Contact with a surface that harbors the fungus (such as the shower floor)

Signs & Symptoms

  • Cracking or peeling skin, usually between the toes
  • Itching and/or burning sensation on the feet
  • Reddened skin around the toes or the bottom and sides of the feet
  • Blistering can also be a sign of fungal infection

What Do I Do?

  • Keep your feet clean and dry
  • Keep your socks and shoes clean
  • Change socks often during the day to keep your feet dry
  • Over the counter antifungal creams and sprays are available for treatment
  • If your Athlete’s Foot shows no improvement within 2 to 4 weeks, consult a doctor for possible prescription medication
  • If you are diabetic or have a weak immune system, you should consult your doctor about treatment

If Left Untreated

If left untreated, it could lead to a secondary bacterial skin infection such as cellulitis, requiring antibiotics to treat increased itching and redness.

Prevention Tips

  • Wear sandals or other footwear in showers or pool areas
  • Keep feet clean and dry
  • Change socks often to keep feet dry
  • Use antifungal powder or drying powder to keep feet dry, especially if you have reoccurring problems with Athlete’s Foot

What Is It?

Diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage caused by diabetes (high blood sugar), usually occurring in the legs and feet.  It can develop slowly after many years of diabetes or may occur early in the disease.

What Causes It?

High blood sugars over a prolonged period of time can cause damage to the nerves. In addition to high blood sugars, other contributing causes to diabetic neuropathy include genetic factors and smoking.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Numbness in feet and toes
  • Tingling in toes
  • Foot pain
  • Muscle weakness in legs and feet

What Do I Do?

  • The goal of treatment for diabetic neuropathy is to prevent further progression and alleviate discomfort.
  • The key is to get blood sugars under control through diet and/or medication.
  • A healthy diet low in fat and sugar, exercise as well as regular visits with your physician are very important in controlling diabetes.
  • There are oral medications that can be taken to help control diabetic neuropathy and minimize the symptoms. A physician should be consulted regarding taking medication for diabetic neuropathy.
  • Those with diabetic neuropathy should inspect their feet daily for any signs of redness or cuts. If you are unable to examine your own feet, have someone else check them for you.
  • It is important to wear shoes that fit properly, and you may consult your doctor about wearing diabetic shoes. Diabetic shoes generally have a deeper, wider toe box along with moldable insoles to help prevent irritation and ulceration.

Looking for a product to treat diabetic neuropathy? Browse our full selection of treatment solutions.

If Left Untreated

Diabetic neuropathy can lead to many complications, especially if left untreated. These include:

  • Loss of limb – a cut or injury may not be noticed due to lack of sensation. This can result in a serious infection, ulceration and the possible loss of the infected limb.
  • Deterioriation of the joints of the foot (Charcot Foot)
  • Sometimes leads to difficulty walking and weakness in the foot muscles

Prevention Tips

Those with diabetes should monitor their blood sugar closely and be advised by a physician in order to keep blood sugar levels under control. Diabetics should also have their feet checked regularly by a podiatrist to help prevent foot complications and to catch any diabetic foot issues early.

Ankle sprains occur when the foot rolls, twists, or turns beyond its normal range of motion. When the ligaments that hold the ankle bones and joint in position become stretched beyond their normal range, an ankle sprain occurs. In a severe ankle sprain, these ligaments can actually tear and rupture.

The Achilles Tendon is a tendon that connects the muscles at the back of the leg to the heel. Achilles Tendonitis is when this tendon becomes painful and swollen where it connects to the heel.